Burton Easy Livin - 2010

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Looking for a freestyle twin with some guts? The Burton Easy Livin’ is great for jibbing around the park and pistes…need a bit more torsional stiffness and stability for hitting the pipe and larger booters the Easy Livin’ delivers. A high spec package that snowboarders of all levels will get along with.

Manufacturer's Description:

Turn on. Tune in. Tweak out. Park lines, cliff lines, pillow lines, jib lines, rhythm lines, switch lines, and straight lines. For Danny, nothing’s out of bounds. His latest creation, the NEW Easy Livin™, is like a park board on ‘roids—a mini shred menace that’s equally equipped for hauling ass off 100-footers. All-wheel-drive edge tech, an ultra-stabilizing directional shape, and the endless adjustability of the Channel combine in a stick that’s 100% devoted to the art of having fun.

Recommended for park riding. Recommended for halfpipe riding Recommended for rail riding High cost snowboard Camber construction Directional twin shape

Year: 2010


Available Lengths (cm):
152, 155, 158, 160


Riding Style:
Freestyle/Park


Specifications:

The Channel (binding system)
SHAPE: Twin
FLEX: Directional
CORE: Park Fly II™ Core with Dualzone™ EGD™ and Negative Profile
FIBERGLASS: Dual Density Triax™ Response Fiberglass
BASE: Sintered N2O WFO Vision
EDGES: Pressure Distribution Edges with Grip and Rip™ Tune
SIDEWALLS: 10:45™
EXTRAS: Elliptical Kicks, Pro-Tip™, and Infinite Ride™


Similar boards:
Atomic Axum - 2010
Signal Hammer Series - 2010
Nitro Rook - 2010
GNU Danny Kass C2 BTX - 2010

Burton Easy Livin

Snowboard Review:

There are three letters that sum-up the Burton Easy Living and they are ‘FUN’. The Easy Living is the kind of board that you can strap to your feet and you’ll instantly be feeling ‘it’. Nobody knows exactly what ‘it’ is but when you’re feeling ‘it’ everything comes together; you start landing all those tricks you’ve been working on all season and all the frustrations and niggling issues you had with snowboarding float away.

On the Piste the Easy Living dealt well with both icy and slushy conditions and was remarkably stable on a flat base and edge, I was amazed that there was no chatter from the nose or tail when gunning it down the icier slopes. When I introduced more technical short radius, closed ended turns on the steeper terrain the Easy Living performed surprisingly well as the torsional flex, which was slightly softer than a high-end all-mountain board, allowed me to engage my edge slightly earlier when pedalling with my feet.  When jibbing on the flatland and hitting smaller hits on the side of the slope the Easy Living came into its own; spinning, manualing, pressing, popping and reverting were effortless as the board is so lively.

In the park the Easy Living enjoyed hitting rails and hitting kickers of all sizes. On the rails I was able to manipulate the board how I wanted through my feet and body weight and the edges didn’t feel catchy. When hitting the kickers the board was confident on all sizes of jumps; it was responsive and lively enough to have fun on the smaller jumps and stable and poppy enough to enjoy the larger jumps with a 15m+ table. I only had one run through the Pipe and although it wasn’t in the same league as some of the stiffer high-end boards it held a reasonably strong edge when ascending both the icy and slushy walls. It was also much easier to spin and tweak in the air than it’s longer counterparts. Unfortunately I didn’t have a chance to ride this board off-piste but I’m sure that it would ride providing you purchase an appropriate length (i.e. not too small).

Like a lot of next seasons boards the Easy Living comes with the Burton EST binding system which is very versatile and convenient to use providing you don’t mind purchasing a new set of Burton bindings. During the test I used a pair of Burton Mala Vita, which have a slightly stiffer highback and heavily padded straps; they felt very similar to the 2007 Salomon SPX Pro bindings I normally ride.
The Easy Living really is an all-mountain jib-stick so if you’ve been riding a slightly stiffer high-end board and fancy a board that is a bit more flexible and lively but you don’t want to give-up the stability and confidence that your previous board gave you then definitely have a look at the Easy Living. Similarly if you ride a jib stick and want a board with more guts then you should give this board a demo. For all you instructors out there this board would be the perfect board for teaching on as demonstrations of the basics are made easy by the more forgiving flex and higher-end lessons on carving and freestyle would be effortless too.

Posted by Tom Ewbank in • Burton

User Snowboard Reviews

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What colour is snow?

wild bill on February 02, 2010 at 12:39 AM

How about a comparison of the boards that offer this rocker/camber design?  How does this compare to a Lib Tech Travis Rice BTX, or a Never Summer RC?  Any differences?  What is your take on this approach to board design?

Jason on February 10, 2010 at 08:53 AM

I’ve heard from others that this board is actually somewhat mid-stiff, a bit harder to butter and press. I guess this was not your experience. Was it a playful board in the park?

Tom Ewbank on February 12, 2010 at 03:16 PM

Very playful in the park and not difficult in the slightest to butter or press…..but if you’ve ridden a K2 Jibpan or Technine board it probably will seem a little stiffer. It’s not a rail specific board but it’s very good on them…..along the same lines as a K2 Believer or Nidecker Advanced. Before riding the Easy Livin’ I’d had a GNU riders choice which was much stiffer in comparison. At the bottom of my review I quote:

‘The Easy Living really is an all-mountain jib-stick so if you’ve been riding a slightly stiffer high-end board and fancy a board that is a bit more flexible and lively but you don’t want to give-up the stability and confidence that your previous board gave you then definitely have a look at the Easy Living. Similarly if you ride a jib stick and want a board with more guts then you should give this board a demo.’

Hope this helps,

Tom

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