Need tips on riding rockered snowboard

 
     

duckforest

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Total Posts: 2 Joined 2011-11-12

Posted: 12 November 2011 04:12 AM

Hi guys,
I’ve been riding cambered boards for close to 7 years now. Last year I decided to buy a Neversummer SL to see what all the rocker / rocker-camber hype was all about and I’ve been having difficulty adjusting to it.

I usually like to carve and go down steeper terrain and putting weight on my nose and initiating turns with my front foot, but I found it wasn’t the same with my new board. I kept washing out on a lot of my turns.

Would anyone have any advice on the adjustments needed to go from Camber to rocker/ rocker-camber?

Thanks for the help!

 

  

Rich Ewbank

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Posted: 12 November 2011 10:13 AM

It didn’t take long for me to adjust to riding hyrbrid cambers if I’m honest but I can certainly understand why it’s happening. Is the wash-out coming from the nose and of the board or is the board flexing too heavily at the waist which is throwing you over the front of the board?

Either way, you need to try and ride with your weight 50:50 over the front and back bindings. If you keep your centre of mass between the bindings then the nose and tail won’t have a chance to wash out. When I started tackling steep terrain I did exactly the same thing to make sure that I committed 100% to initiating the turn through the fall-line in fact I even used to out more forward lean on my front binding to make sure I did it without having to think about it. Too much weight through the front foot and if you hit some slush, ice, pow you’ll be unable to adjust quickly and control your edge. It sounds like riding your new SL is going to benefit your technique a lot… it might take a while to get it but when you do, you’ll be a much stronger rider for it.

Rich

 

  

duckforest

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Posted: 13 November 2011 08:36 AM

Thanks for the tip Rich. I guess I was always boarding the wrong way. I was always putting 70% of my weight on my front foot, especially when I was going through the steeper runs.

I can’t wait for this season to start, and I can’t wait to get back on my SL again.

One other question for you, when you’re riding with your weight 50:50, is your front foot still initiating the turns, or are you generally rocking both feet back and forth?

 

  

Rich Ewbank

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Posted: 13 November 2011 09:47 AM

Yeah you’re always intiating subconciously with your front foot, but the movement really feels (at least for carves) as if you are rocking from edge to edge. As you start to get more aggressive with your carves you push hard into the turn with your front leg to engage the sidecut quicky and then power through popping out with your back leg but it’s a very brief pump, you don’t keep your weight on that front foot.

A bit of practice and you’ll get your weight 50:50 in no time.

 

  

MagnePange

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Posted: 15 November 2011 07:39 PM

Sounds like it could be an effective edge problem?  Camber gives a more effektive bite in to the ground.
One way to compensate that could be to edge the board more to give pressure on the edges.

R´s 50/50 technique is good but remember that a good carve comes from a combination of leaning your body and shuffle your board around. I think that any board would loose the grip (at least in the tail) if you have 70 % of the weight on your front foot.

Try to stay 50:50 like R´s says and rather move the board forward for turn intitation and then move the board a bit back for kick out of the turn.

It´s like drawing an 8 down the vertical line. Soo the middle of the eight is when you stand up in the transition between your turns.

One problem that you could encounter if you are used to riding 70% BW on front and switch to the 50/50 weight distribution is board chatter due to lognitudional stress in the board. That could be avoided by riding more in to the fall line.

R´s is a engineer so he could probably say a lot more about this.

So this is just a simple GP´s own toughts on the subject of matter.

 

  

Rich Ewbank

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Posted: 15 November 2011 07:44 PM

Hey MP, did you ever work-out which board to get with your hard earned media dollars?

 

  

MagnePange

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Posted: 15 November 2011 07:48 PM

I think it will be a week in Engelberg instead =)

 

  

Rich Ewbank

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Posted: 15 November 2011 08:07 PM

Oh la la! Yep I’d take the week in Engleberg too!

 

  

NateDogg

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Total Posts: 7 Joined 2011-02-02

Posted: 25 November 2011 09:29 PM

I just read thru the topic here and it sounds interesting. I too just bought my second board which is a hybrid and I’m coming off a cambered park board.

First board: Artec - Gabe Taylor 155, Flow NXT AT binding, Bon Fire boots
this was my first board in my first season boarding last year.

Second board: NS - Raptor 159, Flux SF45 binding, Celcius Opus boots
my new ride.

I am really unsure what to expect as my Artec is really the only board I’ve riden. All I know is the board never responded as much as I wanted. I only ended up with that board cuz I didn’t know what to look for and the salesman is an idiot. I said I want to board in much the same places I ski and have no intentions of hanging out in a park and I end up with a park board.

Anyways to get back on topic I always found the board never carved the way I imagined a board should. I’m sure some of that has to do with my experience but not all considering the board ain’t built for that anyhow. I found the Artec would almost want to keep moving foward when initiating a turn and it would chatter when going high speeds and carving aggressively. The foward “inertia” made it really easy to switch but I don’t care much for that anyways which is why I went with a directional this time.

I am wondering how things will turn out this season because I only started shifting my weight slightly to front and back foot at the end of last season. I am much more comfortable riding between my bindings. Whatever the case I am expecting a totally different and exhillerating ride. I like to ride fast, big carves and want to get into some pow and small jumps. I think my raptor is better suited for my style.

I’ll be using the Artec until all the rocks and trees are covered but when I get a chance to break out the raptor I’ll let you guys know how it went.

 

  

MagnePange

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Posted: 27 November 2011 11:58 AM

Whit 20 years of skiing the carving of a snowboard will come naturally to you. The principle is the same. In skiing you put a slight pressure on the heels as you go out of the turn.

In snowboarding the carving feeling is more pronounced as you can put a lot of weight on the tail at the end of the carv….

 

  

shredcrazy

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Total Posts: 10 Joined 2011-12-18

Posted: 19 December 2011 07:24 PM

rocker is not better than camber!
rocker is for a different type of riding, so if you switch to a rocker board, and it doesn’t fit your type of riding, go back to camber.
Rocker (reverse Camber) is good for playing around at slower speeds, and for powder.  Rocker lifts your tip at tail, so you dont catch edges as easily, and float in powder better, but you wash out easier, and dont have the stability or responsiveness as you would on a camber board.

Camber is good for high speeds, big jumps, popping ollies, and riding everything! and you can get camber boards that have slightly lifted contact points, so that you have a catch free smooth ride.

rocker will benefit you if:
your a beginner
your riding style is; playing around at slower speeds, buttering, pressing etc
riding powder

camber will benefit you if you:
ride everything!
you ride fast
you hit big jumps
you ride pipe
or you ride ice

 

  

NateDogg

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Posted: 22 December 2011 02:05 AM

Well I finally rode the NS Raptor and didn’t really start to enjoy it until the 2nd day. It took some getting used to but once I got into a rhythm it was really nice. I think my biggest challenge at first was my commitment to a carve. Once I started letting the board do it’s thing it all started coming together. When I finally started letting er rip the true nature of the Raptor started to reveal it self.

Sorry Shedcrazy but I gotta disagree with you, this board it made to charge and carve. It is not a rocker but a hybrid, however much different ride than my cambered board which did not do well at high speed carves on groomed runs. I only found a couple patches of decent pow and the Raptor just glided thru it with ease.

The only thing I didn’t like much were my binding and boots (listed above in previous post). The top strap on my front foot keep getting loose and the boots felt like the hardest pair of hockey skates when walking. Both are rated pretty high on other sites but overall I was not impressed. I just might throw my Flow binding on the new deck. Not sure what the deal is with the boots, they felt good when I put them on in the store but now they hurt to walk in. Feel good and stiff when boarding though.

 

  

shredcrazy

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Total Posts: 10 Joined 2011-12-18

Posted: 22 December 2011 08:56 AM

well yeah a hybrid is gonna act differently than a rocker, also, you have flexibility and all the other tech that plays into how the board rides, just as camber and rocker are for different types of riding, so is everything else that goes into a board, your last board might have been too flexible to be stable at high speeds, the sidecut radius will effect your edge hold as well.
My point was to get a board that fits your riding style rather than switching to a different technology just because its the latest thing.  And yes in some cases the lastest thing might be the best, but it might be worse, and a lot of that depends on your individual riding style.
And as your boots go, its the same deal, stiff boots are more responsive, so they are usually better for going fast, just like stiff boards, and softer boards and boots are for playin around at lower speeds.  neither one is necessarily better than the other, it depends on your riding style.  for example, a racer is gonna want the most responsive setup, so he gets a stiff camber board, stiff boots, stiff bindings and adjust the high-back forward to touch his boot.  On the other hand the rail guy gets a soft rocker board, and de-tunes the edges because you don’t use edges on a rail, and you don’t want em catching, then he gets soft flexible boots so he has more ankle mobility so he can balance easier on rails, and he might even take off his high-backs all together so that when he leans a little to heel heavy on the rail his board doesn’t follow instantly, and lay him on his butt.  it all depends on your riding style. thats why they make so freaking many types of boards.  Now some of us may shred everything and anything, and not really have a preference, and thats where the hybrids come into play, but then again its not just rocker and camber that make up a board, its everything from flexibility to shape, to where the bindings are mounted.

Anyways im just saying, dont give into hype.  cause maybe the people hyping the product and telling you its the best, only ride rails, and your a racer, or vice versa.  or they are just idiots. or they just have a personal preference that you would think is totally wack.

oh and if you hate walking in those stiff boots, try skiing for a day, you wont ever complain again lol.

 

  

 
     
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